It’s understood that misidentifying newborns can lead to very serious errors, such as, administering the wrong blood products or even sending the wrong infant to surgery. In an effort to prevent newborn identification errors, The Joint Commission recently issued a new requirement that goes into effect January 1, 2019, requiring a distinct naming convention for newborn identification. The new element of performance (EP) will apply to all Joint Commission-accredited hospitals that provide labor and delivery services.

Newborns are a vulnerable patient population because they often appear similar and are unable to speak. The Joint Commission determined there was a need for improved newborn identification practices in the obstetric unit, after extensive research and discussions with leaders in the field.

National Patient Safety Goal

NPSG.01.01.01 Use at least two patient identifiers when providing care, treatment, and services.

NPSG.01.01.01 EP3: For newborn patients: Use distinct methods of identification for newborn patients.

Note: Examples of methods to prevent misidentification may include the following:

– Distinct naming systems could include using the mother’s first and last names and the newborn’s gender (for example: “Smith, Judy Girl” or “Smith, Judy Girl A” and “Smith, Judy Girl B” for multiples).

– Standardized practices for identification banding (for example, two body-site identification and barcoding).

– Establish communication tools among staff (for example, visually alerting staff with signage noting newborns with similar names).

For more information, visit www.jointcommission.org or https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/R3_17_Newborn_identification_6_22_18_FINAL.pdf

For more information about mother and infant identification wristbands and L&D products, visit www.pdchealthcare.com/newborn.

Naming Convention bandCU baby band

Summary
Joint Commission Issues New Requirement for Distinct Naming Conventions for Newborn Identification
Article Name
Joint Commission Issues New Requirement for Distinct Naming Conventions for Newborn Identification
Description
Newborns are a vulnerable patient population because they often appear similar and are unable to speak. The Joint Commission determined there was a need for improved newborn identification practices in the obstetric unit, after extensive research and discussions with leaders in the field.
Author
Publisher Name
PDC Healthcare
Publisher Logo
SHARE
Previous articleHow Sheila R. Veloz Breast Center Promotes Employee Health with Mammo Monday
Next articleHow TimeAlert® IV Helps Remind Nurses When It’s Time to Change IV Tubing
Owen Rooney
Owen Rooney is a Marketing Manager of Patient Identification at PDC, where he works with hospital clients to help identify and provide solutions for their unique needs and challenges. Prior to joining PDC, Owen worked in the medical device industry for the last 13 years, the last seven of which were in Product Management. He helped to create a patient safety solutions program that helped hospitals save money, reduced patient injuries, and made nurses jobs more efficient. In his free time, Owen enjoys spending time with family, traveling, camping, and sports (specifically basketball, football, and baseball). For 2 years, he lived on an island with a population of 15,000 people.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here